circuit simulator

Real-time Test & Measurement with TINA and TINACloud

Watch our tutorial video   about Real-time Test & Measurement with TINA and TINACloud.

Real-timemeasurement-blog2

TINA is far more than a simulation software. You can use it with local or remote measurement hardware that allows real-time measurements controlled by TINA’s on-screen virtual instruments.

With the TINALab II supplementary hardware you can turn your computer into a real-time multifunction T&M instrument integrated into TINA.

You can also plug experimenter modules to study, simulate, measure, and troubleshoot virtually the whole range of analog and digital electronics.

LabXplorer can be used with its virtual instruments both stand-alone or remotely through the Internet or LAN.

It also supports the TINA circuit simulation program and its cloud based version TINACloud for comparison of simulation and measurements as a unique tool for circuit development, troubleshooting, and the study of analog and digital electronics.

In remote mode LabXplorer’s virtual instruments run on most OSs and computers, including PCs, Macs, thin clients, tablets–even on many smart phones, smart TVs and e-book readers.

You can use LabXplorer remotely in the classroom, computer lab, at home, and, in fact, anywhere in the world that has internet access. LabXplorer comes with various, remotely programmable, plug-in analog, digital and mixed circuit experiment boards.

Download the FREE trial demo of TINA Design Suite and get:

  1. One year free access to TINACloud (the cloud-based, multi-language, installation-free online version of TINA now running in your browser anywhere in the world.)
  2. An immediate 20% discount from the offline version of TINA
  3. Free license for your second computer, laptop etc.

Click here to download the FREE trial demo of TINA

DesignSoft Team
www.tina.com
www.tinacloud.com

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Creating Single and Double-sided PCBs in TINA

Watch our tutorial video   to see how easy it is to create PCB circuits in TINA. We will use a battery, a resistor, a switch and two LEDs.

 

creatingsingleanddoublesidedpcb-yt

Download the FREE trial demo of TINA Design Suite and get:

  1. One year free access to TINACloud (the cloud-based, multi-language, installation-free online version of TINA now running in your browser anywhere in the world.)
  2. An immediate 20% discount from the offline version of TINA
  3. Free license for your second computer, laptop etc.
Click here to download the FREE trial demo of TINA

 

www.tina.com

You can also find below the script of the video: Creating Single and Double-sided PCBs in TINA

In this demonstration we will show how easy it is to create PCB circuits in TINA.

We will use a battery, a resistor, a switch and two LEDs.

Start TINA.

Let’s first place a battery on the editing screen.

Select battery from the Basic Toolbar

Let’s change its voltage to 3V.

Double-click the Battery and in the Voltage field enter 3.

A footprint is automatically associated with each component.

If you click on the Footprint Name line you can see that a small battery symbol has already been assigned.

Now, click the 3 dots button in the Footprint name field.

The PCB Information dialog box appears.

Select the BH800S_2032 button cell battery symbol (in our case the default symbol)

Click OK or in case no changes are needed click Cancel

then Click OK to confirm the change to the voltage.

Now, let’s add the next component, a resistor.

Let’s change the resistance value to 68 Ohms.

Double-click the Resistor and in the Resintance field enter 68.

It is possible to change the footprint for the resistor as well, to symbols of various lengths or SMD.

In this case let’s use the R_AX200 W100 footprint (in our case the default) and click OK.

Approve the 68 Ohm resistance value by clicking the OK button.

Next let’s add a switch.

Click on the Switches tab and select the Alternate switch from the Switches toolbar.

Rotate the switch by 180 degrees, then place it.

Next double-click on it , and in the Footprint Name field, press the 3 dots button and from the Footprint list select the SW-SPDT-TS01-C switch.

Click OK.

Click ok again.

Lastly, let’s add two LEDs. 

Click on the Semiconductors tab, then press the LED’s icon on the Toolbar and select LED from the list.

 Rotate it by 90 degrees and place it on the schematic.

This is by default a red LED.

Let’s make the second LED of another color.

Place the LED, then double click on it.

Click the 3 dots button in the Type line. The Catalog Editor window appears.As You can see it is a red LED.

You can choose from several different types, each with a different color.

Let’s choose the second on the list, which will be green.

Note that the footprint in this case follows from the component partnumber and is automatically assigned.

Click OK.

Click OK again.

The green LED appears on the screen.

All that is left is to connect the components with wire.

Cick on the first point, trace the wire’s path with the mouse, and click again at the end point.

Next, connect the remaining terminals.

Connect the lower part of the switch to the red LED and the higher part to the green.

Connect the ground, by clicking on the diodes.

Now the circuit is complete.

Let’s test it interactively by clicking the DC interactive mode button.

The red LED lights up immediately.

Let’s click on the switch. The green lights up as well.

To see the realistic representations of the components used in the simulation click on the 2D/3D view switch. 

Finally, let’s switch back to the standard schematic symbols, and create a PCB from this circuit.

First, click the PCB Design icon.

The PCB Design dialog window appears.

In the dialog you can choose to modify an existing project or start a new project.

In this case let’s do the latter.

Note that Autoplacement is already selected.

Autorouting will be completed later once the components are in place.

TINA includes a number of board templates which you may use in your designs.

In this case we will be creating a single sided, one layer PCB, so let’s choose the first option.

Note that it is possible to create more complicated two-sided, multi-layer PCBs using the appropriate templates.

Click Cancel

The board dimensions may be customized; in this example let’s use the default settings (with a board width 2 and a board height 1.5 inches)

Click OK, and the components are placed automatically.

Before Autorouting the components most often need to be rearranged.

Use the mouse and the Rotate icons to move the components to their desired positions.

Next, select the Autorouting command from the Tools menu,

or press Ctrl+F5,

and the components are routed.

To see the PCB in 3D, click on the 3D View button.

By switching to TINA’s Schematic Editor screen, you can also see the schematic diagram of the circuit.

Let’s now test the circuit by using the switch on the 3D view.

Note: Before testing make sure that the DC button is on.

Note that in 3D view it is also possible to see the routing on the bottom of the board.

To do this, hold down the left mouse button and tilt the board to see the underside.

Here we have shown how to create a single-sided PCB in TINA.

In the following section we will show how to make a double-sided PCB.

To turn the design from the previous section into a double-sided PCB you only need to change the layer settings.

Select the Layer settings command from the Options menu.

As you can see the top layer of the PCB is currently unused.

If we change it to a Routing layer the autorouter will use both the top and the bottom layers.

Click the Label in the Type line and then select the Routing from the list.

Click OK to approve the layer settings.

Next, select the Autoroute board command from the Tools menu or press Ctrl+F5. 

Now two wires have been placed on the top of the board.

To see the changes in 3D, click the 3D View button.

Now on the top of the board we can see one wire running from the LED to the battery and another between the resistor and the battery.

Tilt the PCB to view the routing on the bottom of the board.

Tilt the board back and click on the switch to test it.

This concludes our demonstration of creating single and double-sided PCBs in TINA.

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Using Hardware Description Languages in TINA, part 4: Creating Analog Components with Verilog-AMS, now with English voice-over

Hardware Description Languages (HDL) are powerful tools to describe and simulate complex electronic devices.

In this tutorial video we will show how you can create a macro from a Verilog-AMS (.vams) code and use in TINA. You can create macros from VHDL, Verilog and Verilog-A files in a similar way.

Watch our tutorial video to see how  you can create a macro from a Verilog-AMS (.vams) code and use in TINA.

Download the FREE trial demo of TINA Design Suite and get:

  1. One year free access to TINACloud (the cloud-based, multi-language, installation-free online version of TINA now running in your browser anywhere in the world.)
  2. An immediate 20% discount from the offline version of TINA
  3. Free license for your second computer, laptop etc.
Click here to download the FREE trial demo of TINA

 

www.tina.com

You can also find below the script of the video: 

Using Hardware Description Languages in TINA, part 4: Creating Analog Components with Verilog-AMS

In this tutorial video we will show how you can create a DAC Converter macro-model from a  Verilog-AMS (.vams) code and use in TINA. You can create macros from VHDL, Verilog and Verilog-A files in a similar way.

Let’s demonstrate the details. 

We will first create the Generator with serial output (SPI). This is given in VHDL. Next, we will create a DAC Converter macro given in Verilog AMS.

Open TINA

Click the  Tools menu

Select  New Macro Wizard

Type a name for the new macro

In our case: SPI

Change the Settings from Current circuit to From file

Click the  Open icon

Select TINA examples

Open the Examples

Verilog-AMS folder

Change the file type to .VHD

then Select the spi file and click Open

Press the Next button

You can either Select the  Auto generate shape

or you can load a shape from the library

Let’s select the  Auto Generate shape option

then Click Next

You can browse the code and see how easy to create an SPI output in VHDL

Click Next again

and save the macro (SPI.tsm) into the default Macrolib folder.

You can insert the Macro by pressing the Insert button or you can select the

“Insert/Macro…” from the menu.

Click the Insert button

The macro will be attached to your cursor. Place it wherever you wish on the workspace.

Next, we will create a DAC Converter macro from a .VAMS code and we will use the VHDL macro (created previously) and the Verilog-AMS macro in the same circuit to demonstrate that in TINA you can use VHDL and Verilog (Verilog-A, Verilog-AMS) macros in the same circuit.

Click the  Tools menu

Select  New Macro Wizard

Type a name for the new macro

In our case: DAC

Change the Settings from Current circuit to From file

Click the Open icon

Select TINA examples

Open the Examples

Verilog-AMS folder

Change the file type to .VAMS

then Select the dac vams.vams file and click Open

Press the Next button

Select the  Auto Generate shape option

Press the Next button

Change the orientation of the  pins  listed ont he screen   into right

Click the appropriate modul to be selected then  click the left button under the orientation field then select right  

Change the position of the pins on the right side by using the “Move up” or “Move down” buttons.

Change the position of the moduls on the left side as well:

Click Next

and save your tsm file under the name DAC into your default Macrolib folder

Click Insert

and place the DAC macro on the workspace

Double-click the DAC macro,

then press the Enter Macro button to check its content

The content of the Macro appears

Now, close the HDL Editor Window of TINA

Let’s create the following circuit to test the new DAC model:

 Connect the DAC inputs with the appropriate SPI outputs 

Draw a wire starting from the CLK pin

From the Meters Toolbar select the Voltage Pin and connect to the wire

Double-click the Voltage Pin & rename the label into CLK

Continue connecting the DAC inputs with the appropriate SPI outputs

Start drawing the wire from  VREF

Select the Voltage Source (VS1) from the Basic Toolbar and connect it to VREF.

Next, connect the Ground to VS1

Connect the Battery (V1) to VDD, and a Ground to AGND

Finally connect a Voltage Pin to VOUTA (Analog Output)

then rename it

Let’s test the circuit by Running Transient  Analysis

Click Analysis on the menu then select Transient

then Click OK

Let’s test the circuit for a time period of 1ms 

Click Analysis on the menu then select Transient again

Click the Analysis menu on the Toolbar, then select the Transient mode again. 

In the Transient Analysis dialog box change the value of the

End display field to 1m 

Our DAC Converter works as expected.

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Using Hardware Description Languages in TINA, part 3: Creating Analog Components with Verilog-A, now with English voice-over

Hardware Description Languages (HDL) are powerful tools to describe and simulate complex electronic devices.

In this tutorial video we will show how you can create a macro from a Verilog-A (.va) code and use in TINA. You can create macros from VHDL, Verilog and Verilog-AMS files in a similar way.

Watch our tutorial video to see how  you can create a macro from a Verilog-A (.va) code and use in TINA.

 usinghardwaredescriptionlanguagesintinapart3-voice-youtube

 

Download the FREE trial demo of TINA Design Suite and get:

  1. One year free access to TINACloud (the cloud-based, multi-language, installation-free online version of TINA now running in your browser anywhere in the world.)
  2. An immediate 20% discount from the offline version of TINA
  3. Free license for your second computer, laptop etc.
Click here to download the FREE trial demo of TINA

 

www.tina.com

You can also find below the script of the video: 

Using Hardware Description Languages in TINA, part 3: Creating Analog Components with Verilog-A

Hardware Description Languages are powerful tools to describe and simulate complex electronic devices.

In this tutorial video we will show how you can create a macro from a Verilog-A (.va) code and use in TINA.

You can create macros from VHDL, Verilog and Verilog-AMS files in a similar way.

You can create a macro from any .vhd / .v / .va / .vams file that contains an entity (interface to the outside world) with its architecture (description of the hardware).

Files with .vhd extension are VHDL files, with .v extension are Verilog files, with .va extension are Verilog-A files and with .vams extension are Verilog-AMS files.

The ports declared in the interface part will automatically appear in the macro symbol (shape). You can associate an automatic rectangular block or a schematic symbol from TINA’s library with the macro.

In case of automatic rectangular blocks you can edit and reposition the interface pins.

Let’s demonstrate the details.

Open TINA

Click the Tools menu

Select New Macro Wizard…

Type a name for the new macro In our case: JFET1

Change the Settings from Current circuit to From file

Click the Open icon

Select TINA examples

Open the Examples and then the Verilog-A folder

Change the file type to .va

Open the Device Models folder then Select the jfet.va file and

Click Open

Press the Next button

You can either Select the Auto generate shape or you can load a shape from the library

Let’s Select first the Auto Generate shape option

then Click Next

Check the interface line

Change the orientation of “d” into up, and “s” into down

You can also browse the Verilog-A code

Click Next

and save the macro (jfet1.tsm) into the default Macrolib folder.

You can insert the Macro by pressing the Insert button or you can select the “Insert/Macro…” from the menu.

Click the Insert button

The macro will be attached to your cursor. Place it wherever you wish on the workspace.

Let’s demonstrate the case when you select the “Load shape from the library” option.

Click the  Tools menu

Select New Macro Wizard

and let’s name the new macro as JFET2.

After selecting the jfet.tsm file, press the Next button

Select the TINAICS folder

Find the JFET symbol by clicking the long vertical button and then using the scrollbar

Click Next

Check if the uppercase D, G, S symbol pins are properly connected with the lowercase d, g, s macro parameters

if not, you can easily update the connections by dragging the connection labels

In our case no changes are needed.

Click Next

then the Insert button

Place the Macro on the workspace

By double-clicking the macro, then pressing the Enter Macro button you can check its content

The content of the macro appears

Now close the HDL Editor window of TINA

Let’s create the following circuit to test the new transistor model:

Select the Voltage Source and the Voltage Generator from the Sources Toolbar

Next, select the Current Arrow from the Meters Toolbar, then  rotate it

Click the Insert menu

Select Macro

Select User Macros

Select the jfet2.tsm, then click Open

The Verilog-A macro will be attached to your cursor, you can place it on the workspace

Draw the wires to connect the components

Double-click the labels to rename them

and you can also replace the labels if necessary by dragging it while it is selected

Let’s test the circuit by Running Analysis

DC Analysis

Click Analysis on the Toolbar

Select DC Analysis

and then DC Transfer Characteristic…

The DC Transfer Characteristic dialog box appears.

Check if the parameters under the Main sweep tab are as shown on the screen

Note that TINA also allows Nested Sweep in the  DC Transfer Characteristic analysis which makes the calculation of device characteristics easier

Click the nested sweep tab and check the parameters shown on the screen.

According to these parameters

9  ID versus VG curves will be calculated with 9 different VG values including

VG= – 2 and VG = 0 as well.

Click OK to run the DC Analysis

Our test circuit works as expected.

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Using Hardware Description Languages in TINA, Part 2: Creating Macros from Verilog, now with English voice-over

Hardware Description Languages (HDL) are powerful tools to describe and simulate complex electronic devices.

In this tutorial video we will show how you can create a macro from a Verilog (.v) code and use       in TINA. You can create macros from VHDL, Verilog-A and Verilog-AMS files in a similar way.

Watch our tutorial video to see how  you can create a macro from a Verilog (.v) code and use           in TINA.

 usinghardwaredescriptionlanguagesintinapart2-voiceover-yt

Download the FREE trial demo of TINA Design Suite and get:

  1. One year free access to TINACloud (the cloud-based, multi-language, installation-free online version of TINA now running in your browser anywhere in the world.)
  2. An immediate 20% discount from the offline version of TINA
  3. Free license for your second computer, laptop etc.
Click here to download the FREE trial demo of TINA.

 

www.tina.com

You can also find below the script of the video: 

Using Hardware Description Languages in TINA, Part 2: Creating Macros from Verilog

In this tutorial video we will show how you can create a macro from a Verilog (.v) code and use in TINA. You can create macros from VHDL, Verilog-A and Verilog-AMS files in a similar way.

For example consider the following Verilog interface:

module half_add (A, B, S, C);   

input A, B;

output S, C;

In this case the A,B ports will appear on the left side and the S,C ports will appear on the right side of the macro shape.

Let’s see how to make a macro from the following Verilog code (a half adder):

module half_add(A, B, S, C);  

input A, B;

output S, C;

assign S = A ^ B;

assign C = A & B;

endmodule

Note that this Verilog code is much simpler than the equivalent VHDL code. This is one of the great advantages of Verilog.

The essential Verilog code of the half adder is 2 lines long only.

Let’s demonstrate the details.

Open TINA

Click the Tools menu

Select New Macro Wizard

Type a name for the new macro In our case: Half adder Verilog

Change the Settings from Current circuit to From file

Click the Open icon

Change the file type to .v

Select TINA examples

Select Examples

Click the Verilog folder

Click Open

Select the Half adder Verilog.v file and press Open

Press the Next button to save the macro,

and save the macro into the default Macrolib folder.

Now you can insert the Macro by pressing the Insert button or you can select the “Insert/Macro…” from the menu.

Click the Insert button

The macro will be attached to your cursor. Place it wherever you wish on the workspace.

To see the content of the macro double-click on it and press the Enter Macro button

The content of the macro appears.

Close the TINA HDL Editor window

Let’s test our newly created macro in TINA’s Digital interactive mode along with the previously created VHDL macro

(See Using Hardware Description languages in TINA, part 1)

Let’s open our previously created Half_ Adder VHDL macro.TSC circuit.

Here is the circuit with two High-Low digital switches, one for each of the A,B inputs, and two logic indicators. We will copy the circuit, then we will change the macro into the Half adder Verilog macro

To select the circuit click at the corner of the area to be selected, hold down the left mouse button then move the mouse and release the left mouse button at the opposite corner.

Click the Copy then the Paste button on the toolbar. Your circuit will be attached to your cursor.  Position it by moving the mouse to the required position and press the left mouse button.

Deselect the circuit by clicking an empty spot.

Click the Half adder VHDL macro to be selected then delete it by pressing the Del key on the keyboard.

Click the Insert menu

Select Macro

Select User Macros

Select the Half adder Verilog.TSM, then click Open

The Verilog macro will be attached to your cursor, you can move and insert it into the place of the deleted VHDL macro.

Let’s test the 2 circuits

Select the Digital interactive mode with the narrow “Select Interactive mode” button on the Toolbar

Press the Dig  button

The logic levels of the nodes appear, Red for High. Blue for Low.

The logic indicators will also show the logic level of the outputs in a Red square for High, and empty square for Low.

Both Half_adder circuits work as required.

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Using the Footprint Editor in TINA, part 1: IC Wizard, now with English voice-over

If you want to create a footprint of an Integrated Circuit the IC Wizard of TINA can assist you.
Activate the IC Wizard from the Insert menu of the Footprint Editor of TINA PCB Designer.  The wizard presents several properties of the IC which you can set.

usingthefootprinteditorintina-icwizardvoice-overyt

In this tutorial video we will use the MAX11166 converter  to show how to use the IC Wizard of TINA Footprint Editor.

Watch our tutorial video to see how  to use the IC Wizard of  TINA Footprint Editor.

Download the FREE trial demo of TINA Design Suite and get:

  1. One year free access to TINACloud (the cloud-based, multi-language, installation-free online version of TINA now running in your browser anywhere in the world.)
  2. An immediate 20% discount from the offline version of TINA
  3. Free license for your second computer, laptop etc.
Click here to download the FREE trial demo of TINA

 

www.tina.com

 

You can also find below the script of the video:

Using the Footprint Editor in TINA, part 1: IC Wizard

Start TINA PCB Designer by using the Start menu of Windows 10

Click the Tools menu

Select Footprint Editor

First, select View

Options

and change the Unit into mm and the Precision into 3

then click OK

Create a new Footprint Library by using the File

Save Library As command

in the Private Catalog Folder of TINA

under the name: MyPackage

Press the Save button

Click the Insert menu

Select IC Wizard

In the Technology group, you can set the mounting mode and the package type of the IC. The mounting mode can be through hole or surface mounted. Depending on the mounting mode the following packages are available: DIP (Dual in line packag e), PGA (Pin grid array package), SPGA (Staggered pin grid array package), SOP (Small outline package), LCC (Leaded chip carrier package), QFP (Quad flat package), BGA (Ball grid array package), SBGA (Staggered ball grid array package), SIP (Single in line package) and ZIP (Zigzag in line package) respectively.

In the Package dimension group, the dimensions (length, width,

3D height) of the package can be set. Depending on the selected package, the 4th parameter is either notch, corner cutoff, or ignored.

The Pad dimension defines the shape and dimensions (length, width)

of the pad. If the mounting mode is through hole, the shape of the

drilled pad can be round, square or octagon. Moreover, the shape

and dimensions of the drill diameter can be defined.

However, if the mounting mode is surface mounted, the shape of the pad

can be circular, rectangular or rounded corner and the appropriate

dimensions can be also set.

In the Pad position, the number of pins and the distances between them can be set according to the package type.

Finally, in the Pad numbering group, the type and direction for pad numbering can be entered, depending on the package type.

Set the data as shown in the IC Wizard window above

Click OK

In the pop-up window the following message appears:

Create IC

Click Yes

You can enlarge the image by using the Zoom option

Next, we will position the Smd Pad

Click the Smd icon, then click on the Editor workspace to place it

Double-click the SMD Pad

and in the SMD Pad Properties Window enter 13 in the name field, 0 in the Center X and Center Y fields

Double-click the Size field and enter 2.5 in the Width and 1.7 in the Height fields

Click OK

Click OK again

We will now position the labels which belong to another layer

Click the little arrow next to the TOP layer icon and select the Silkscreen Top layer

Now you can easily move the Name and the Value labels by holding down the left-mouse button while dragging them

Select again the Top layer when you are done

Click the New Footprint Group icon

Click the <New group> folder and rename it by entering the name: SON then press the Enter button on the keyboard

Note: SON is small-outline no leads type of circuit

Click the Footprint Properties icon

and in the Name field enter: SON12_3x3_12_0.5TP

Click OK

Click the Add Footprint to the library icon

Save the footprint by clicking the Save button

Close the Footprint Editor

You can check the newly created Footprint

Reopen the Footprint Editor

Click File

Open Library

Open the MyPackage.FPL

Next, double-click the SON library, then the new Footprint

The mapping between TINA’s Schematic Symbols and the Footprints used in TINA’s Integrated PCB Designer will be presented in another video.

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Creating Subcircuits from Spice Models with TINACloud: .MODEL format, now with English voice-over

In TINACloud you can create your own components from any Spice models given in .MODEL format that you have made or downloaded from the Internet.

Watch our tutorial video to see how to create a  TINA macro component using a BC846 NPN Bipolar transistor downloaded previously from the web.

 creatingsubcircuitsfromspicemodelsintc-dotmodel-yt

 

Download the FREE trial demo of TINA Design Suite and get:

  1. One year free access to TINACloud (the cloud-based, multi-language, installation-free online version of TINA now running in your browser anywhere in the world.)
  2. An immediate 20% discount from the offline version of TINA
  3. Free license for your second computer, laptop etc.
Click here to download the FREE trial demo of TINA

 

www.tina.com

 

You can also find below the script of the video:

Creating Subcircuits from Spice Models with TINACloud: .MODEL format

In TINACloud you can  create your own components from any Spice models given in .MODEL format that you have made or downloaded from the Internet.

Some device models are stored in Spice .MODEL format.

Let’s download one from the internet and add the model to TINACloud

Here is the model of the BC846 NPN Bipolar transistor

Let’ save this model

In Google Chrome click the right mouse button.

In other browsers find the Save as command

Select Save as

Switch the Save as type into All files

and Save it as a .cir file, as this is one of the extensions that TINACloud expects.

Start TINACloud

To invoke the Schematic Editor

Select New from the File menu

The Schematic Editor appears

Click the Insert button denoted by a  green + sign to invoke the Insert menu

Select Upload macro

Let’s name the new Macro as BC846

Switch into From File from Current Circuit

then Click Choose Files

Enter BC846.cir into the file name field , then click Open

Now click Upload

In the dialog box the following message appears: Macro uploaded.

Click OK

You can simularly add any Spice models in Spice .MODEL format.

Let’s check how to insert the new model into TINACloud.

Select Insert macro from the Insert (+) menu

Now select BC846 then press OK

The new component will appear attached to your cursor and you can place it anywhere on the workspace by moving the mouse and clicking the left mouse button.

Now let’s create the following test circuit by adding a few more components to test the new model.

Select the Resistor from the Basic Toolbar

Use the Rotate left or Rotate right icon then hold the left-mouse button down while moving it and connect it to the Transistor

Repeat this procedure for R2 & R3

Double click the Resistances (R1 & R2) and in their Properties window set the parameters as shown

R2=47k; R3=3k

click OK

Now select the Ground and connect it to the Transistor

Next add the remaining parts and the wires

then Click the Save button to save the file

Let’s save it under the name BC846_test.tsc

Let’s test this circuit using DC Interactive mode.

Press the DC button

The model works as expected.

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Creating Subcircuits from Spice Netlists with TINACloud, now with English voice-over

In TINACloud you can create your own components from any Spice subcircuit that you have made or downloaded from the Internet.

Watch our tutorial video to see how to create a  TINA macro component using a THS4121 Spice Subcircuit downloaded previously from the web.

creatingsubcircuitsfromspicenetlist-tc-voiceover-yt2

Download the FREE trial demo of TINA Design Suite and get:

  1. One year free access to TINACloud (the cloud-based, multi-language, installation-free online version of TINA now running in your browser anywhere in the world.)
  2. An immediate 20% discount from the offline version of TINA
  3. Free license for your second computer, laptop etc.
Click here to download the FREE trial demo of TINA

 

www.tina.com

 

You can also find below the script of the video:

Creating Subcircuits from Spice Netlists with TINACloud

In TINACloud you can create your own components from any Spice subcircuit that you have made or downloaded from the Internet.

In this tutorial we will present how to create a TINA macro component using a THS4121 Spice Subcircuit downloaded previously from the web.

Note that TINA and TINACloud use the same macro components.

Start TINACloud.

To invoke the Schematic Editor

Select New from the File menu

The Schematic Editor appears

Click the Insert (+) button to invoke the Insert menu

Select Upload macro

Let’s name the new macro as THS4121

Switch into From File from Current Circuit

then Click Choose Files

In the Downloads folder Enter ths4121.cir into the file name field

then Click OPEN

click Upload

Now you have to specify the name of the macro pins and also, if you wish, you can place them anywhere around the box.

To move VSS/?, select it by holding down the left-mouse button & moving the mouse, then press the right mouse button & select Cut.

Now move your mouse to the place where you would like to insert the text and select Paste from the Pop-up menu.

The ? must be replaced by the macro pin name, so write VSS/VSS

Repeate this procedure for all items where it is needed.

Click OK

To check the newly created macro select Insert macro from the Insert (+) menu

Select THS4121 from the Dialog Window of the User macros then press OK

The newly created macro will be attached to your cursor and you can place it wherever you wish on the workspace

To check its content double-click the macro.

then press … (Details) in the SubCkt (Content) line

Note that the Netlist also contains an auxiliary subcircuit

Click OK

Now you can create an application circuit by adding other components.

Let’s create the circuit like the one on this sample schematic

Double-click the component

then in the Property dialog enter the required component value & press OK

Save this circuit as THS4121_test_circuit.TSC

Let’s test the DC operation by pressing the interactive DC button.

The model works as expected.

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