Application Circuit

Differential Amplifier CMRR Trim Circuit

Adding a negative- resistance circuit (U2) to the REF pin allows the CMRR of a differential amplifier or instrumentation amplifier to be trimmed. This is done by applying a sine wave of 20Vp-p to the inputs of U1 and adjusting the potentiometer P1 for a minimum signal at the amplifier output. By using an AC source the DC input offset errors do not effect this trim. At 50% rotation of P1 the resistance of R8 cancels the resistance of R5, appearing as a virtual ground to the REF pin. As P1 is adjusted from end to end, R5 is “undercancelled”or “overcancelled” by R8 and the resistance presented to the REF pin goes from a real, positive resistance to a negative resistance. This allows the internal resistor network of U1to be trimmed for maximum CMRR. ( Circuit is created by Neil P. Albaugh  TI – Tucson )

 

 differential amplifier CMRR trim circuit for BLOG3

Differential Amplifier CMRR Trim Circuit

Online Simulation of the Differential Amplifier CMRR Trim Circuit

The great feature of the TINA circuit simulator that you can analyze this circuit immediately with TINACloud the online version of TINA. Of course you can also run this circuit in the off-line version of TINA.

Click here to invoke TINACloud and analyze the circuit.

You can send this link to any TINACloud customers and they can immediatelly load it by a single click and then run using TINACloud.

Michael Koltai
www.tina.com

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Cload Compensation

Driving a capacitive load directly with an op amp is an invitation to instability or oscillation. The amplifier’s output resistance and the load capacitance form a pole  in the feedback circuit. This inserts additional phase shift which will reduce the loop phase margin– perhaps to zero. The effects of reduced phase margin can be  seen in the waveform ringing and gain peaking plots below. By isolating the capacitance with a small resistor (R1) and providing local high-frequency feedback (C2),  very little phase margin is lost. The voltage drop across R1 is sensed by a DC feedback connection (R2) to the circuit output and thereby reduced to virtually zero.
Note the improvement gained by compensating for a Cload!  (Circuit is created by Neil P. Albaugh,  TI – Tucson)

Cload Compensation  circuit:

cap-load for blog

Online Simulation of the Cload Compensation Circuit

The great feature of the TINA circuit simulator that you can analyze this circuit immediately with TINACloud the online version of TINA. Of course you can also run this circuit in the off-line version of TINA.

Click here to invoke TINACloud and analyze the circuit.

You can send this link to any TINACloud customers and they can immediatelly load it by a single click and then run using TINACloud.

Michael Koltai
www.tina.com

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Grounded Cathode Laser Diode Driver

This circuit provides voltage- controlled constant-current biasing of a Grounded Cathode Laser Diode Driver by using a positive supply voltage and a positive control voltage.

As shown, the OPA569 op amp provides an output current of 500mA per volt input. Output is current- limited to 2A by R2. Frequency compensation is provided by C1 R1. This circuit takes advantage of the unique topology of the OPA569; it does not require a shunt resistor to measure its output current. This amplifier provides an output monitor current from pin 19  that is 1/475 th of its output current. The voltage drop across R2 due to this current is used as negative feedback to the amplifier’s inverting input (pin 5). Thus a constant- current output is derived by this feedback. Bypass capacitors are not shown.
Since no shunt resistor is required to measure output current, there is no reduction in output voltage compliance due to shunt resistor voltage drop and this circuit can swing its output voltage very close to its supply rail. This increases efficiency and reduces heat sinking requirements. In fact, supply voltage can be reduced to 3.3V for most laser diodes.

The OPA569 features both a Current Limit (pin 4) and a Thermal Overtemp (pin 7) flag. These flags can be used to protect the amplifier and the Enable (pin 8) can be used to digitally control its status. For further details, see the OPA569  data sheet. The “no connection” warnings simply indicate that these flags are not connected in this circuit; this does not affect the simulation. (Circuit is created by Neil P. Albaugh,  TI – Tucson)

Grounded Cathode Laser Diode Driver for blog2

Grounded Cathode Laser Diode Driver

 

Online Simulation of the Grounded Cathode Laser Diode Driver Circuit

The great feature of the TINA circuit simulator that you can analyze this circuit immediately with TINACloud the online version of TINA. Of course you can also run this circuit in the off-line version of TINA.

Click here to invoke TINACloud and analyze the circuit.

You can send this link to any TINACloud customers and they can immediatelly load it by a single click and then run using TINACloud.

Michael Koltai
www.tina.com

 

 

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Infrared Thermopile Detector Amplifier

This amplifier is designed for a thermopile infrared detector such as an S60M from Dexter Research. This detector output is 101mV/mW with a source resistance of 90k. A CMOS autozero OPA335 is used to minimize offset and drift as well as 1/f noise. The detector response time is 12ms so the amplifier frequency response  is rolled off to minimize its total output noise.
R3 & C2 add an additional pole to the amplifier’s rolloff; this improves the total output noise compared to the conventional R2 & C1 feedback filter. This improvement is evident in the noise plot below. U1 output is unipolar, so C2 can be a good tantalum capacitor. The OPA335 output stage can be pulled- down to zero by an external  negative supply V-, even when operated on a single +5V power supply. By not operating the op amp at the conventional “Vcc/2″ bias point, the output is capable of full  rail- to- rail out-put, increasing the detector amplifier’s dynamic range. (Circuit created by Neil P. Albaugh,  TI – Tucson)

Infrared Thermopile Detector Amplifier:Infrared Thermopile Detector Amplifier for blog

Online Simulation of the Infrared Thermopile Detector Amplifier Circuit

The great feature of the TINA circuit simulator that you can analyze this circuit immediately with TINACloud the online version of TINA. Of course you can also run this circuit in the off-line version of TINA.

Click the link below to invoke TINACloud and analyze the circuit.

https://www.tinacloud.com/tinademo/tina.php?c=54b3ae1ebcf37%3A415378

You can send this link to any TINACloud customers and they can immediatelly load it by a single click and then run using TINACloud.

Michael Koltai
www.tina.com

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Synchronous Modulator and Demodulator

Recovering small signals in the presence of noise is the application most suited to the synchronous modulator and demodulator technique. If a DC voltage or low-frequency AC signal is modulated by a higher frequency carrier (also known as “reference”) the input signal is converted to an AC signal – the carrier frequency sidebands. Demodulating the signal uses a similar technique (also known as “phase sensitive detector”) resulting in the recovered sidebands. A low- pass filter is used to remove carrier artifacts and out-of-band noise. Random noise generated in the amplifier integrates to zero if a very long integration time (a very low freq LPF) is used. It is entirely practical to recover a small signal buried in 40dB of random (white) noise with a synchronous detector. This is sometimes also called a lock -in amplifier”.

The sync modulation/demodulation switches SW1 & SW2 are usually good analog switches. To prevent DC offset, it is important to maintain a precise 50% duty
cycle in the reference generator and switches. (Created by  Neil P. Albaugh,  TI – Tucson)

 

Synchronous modulator and demodulator1

 

Online  Simulation of the Synchronous Modulator and Demodulator Circuit

The great feature of the TINA circuit simulator that you can analyze this circuit immediately with TINACloud the online version of TINA. Of course you can also run this circuit in the off-line version of TINA.

Click the link below to invoke TINACloud and analyze the circuit.

https://www.tinacloud.com/tinademo/tina.php?c=54bd18289bcf0%3A724605

You can send this link to any TINACloud customers and they can immediatelly load it by a single click and then run using TINACloud.

Michael Koltai
www.tina.com

 

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Single Supply Absolute Value Amplifier

This absolute value amplifier has a gain of 0.5V/V and has an input range of within a few mV of -5V to +5V. A buffer amplifier should be used on the output to prevent loading. For a faster amplifier, use an OPA354.

The rail- to- rail input and output characteristics of these CMOS op amps allow them to swing very close to their supply rails– +5V and ground. By using both an inverting and noninverting amplifier to swing only positive (due to their not being capable of swinging below ground) , each op amp acts like a perfect rectifier. Summing their outputs together in R3 & R4 combines them into an absolute value of the amplifier’s input voltage. (Circuit created by Neil P. Albaugh, TI-Tucson)

absolute value amplifier

The great feature of TINA that you can analyze this circuit immediately with TINACloud the online version of TINA. Click the link below to invoke TINACloud and analyze the circuit.

https://www.tinacloud.com/tinademo/tina.php?c=54c657263d83e%3A203818

You can send this link to any TINACloud customer an they can immediatelly load by a single click and then run using TINACloud.

Michael Koltai
www.tina.com

 

 

 

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